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-- many of us congratulate ourselves on the movement of the 60's and we should. the civil rights movement was the greatest movement of my lifetime. feminism is why i am standing here. we were right to stop the vietnam war and we did the right thing. but the 60's were not an unbroken narrative of victory and happiness. they were kind of scary for a lot of people and not just white people. the crime did rise. there were urban riots, the fringe of the entire white movement got violent. divorce rates climbed. there was this sense the country was unraveling. and one of the things i think happened is the democrats were in charge. the democrats were engaged in the great society and the new round of government activism and so because they were in charge when these things seemed to fall apart they got blamed a lot of people i think blame the wrong things for the way the society seemed to fall apart. we were beginning to see offshore the industrialization. people didn't realize it but the blue collar jobs were going away so you have a constituency of people that then became republicans. the governm
mean, a real movement like the labor movement or the anti-war movement on the civil right movement. a bunch of college kids waiving signs. we have to woo have a real movement that connects with people in their every day lives. that's the only way our side wins. thank you very much. >> wait. wait! we have time for one more question. >> you mentioned the power of money it is in churches very suspicious of the fundamentalist schurnlgs they say god wants you to be rich. that is for a part of the problem is. -- i have a needle. come on. >> guys? as a political junkie, i love reading the book. go out there and go to the book signing. buy it. thank you very much. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >>> in a couple of minutes we'll be back with more live coverage of the texas book festival. a panel on education reform is next. here's a look at upcoming book fairs and festivals. this weekend booktv is live from a texas book festival. it includes present tastes by many people. visit booktv.org for complete schedule of the events. >>> national press club book fair a
, congressmen, hip hop and gospel artists as well as civil rights activists have come together over the past few hours to get voters to the polls. just a short time ago i talked to a number of folks who have gathered here, nine days before election day. i asked them why they think this thing is going to be so close. >> i think the election here in florida is going to be one of these bush-gore deals. i look for it to be -- >> you're thinking recount? >> i don't know about recount, but -- >> we hope it's about more than 537. >> yes, yes. >> thank you. >> we'll get back to politics in a moment. right now, though, we turn to the latest on hurricane sandy and for that, we've got it all covered here. nbc meteorologist dylan dreyer with the forecast and white house correspondent mike viquiera standing by with the latest on the president who just got a briefing at fema headquarters. and nbc's thanh truong is on the beach in rehoboth, did he dext let's start with dylan dreyer with the latest advisory from the national hurricane center. what can you tell us? >> we do still have to deal with a category 1 h
. >> in addition to running his own grocery, sylvester also operates tours of significant blues and civil rights spots in the area. >> a lot of people are making money off it. i'm probably the only black doing it. >> this is one of the stops on sylvester's tour. it is what remains of the grocery store where emmitt till whistled at a white woman. that night he was abducted from his bed, brutally murdered, and tossed into the river. the property is owned by one of the jurors that acquitted till's killers. he wants to have a memorial here but can't because the owner has a seven figure asking price. >> everybody trying to make money off the blues and civil rights. and a lot of those people gave us the blues but now they making money off the blues. it don't taste good to a lot of people, but they doing it. >> as for ray de felitta and yvette johnson, work on their film wrapped earlier this year. >> why he spoke that way in the film -- >> "booker's place: a mississippi story" premiered in april at the tribeca film festival. >> beautiful. >> for frank and ray de felitta, it was a crowning collaboration
out of that civil rights movement era. she was talking about that no tired message. we can stand in those lines. you give us one day, we'll at that time one day. you give us voter i.d., we'll get an i.d. and i think that message is important. >> thank you to joy reid. and up next, i'll bring my panel back in on this issue of voter suppression and the backlash against it. could it turn out that the republicans have been their own great undoing. er ] take dayquil... [ ding! ] ...and spend time on the slopes. take alka-seltzer plus cold & cough... [ buzz! ] ...and spend time on the chair. for non-drowsy 6-symptom cold & flu relief. take dayquil. use nyquil... [ ding! ] ...and get longer nighttime cough relief. use alka-seltzer plus night cold & flu... [ coughs ] [ buzz! ] [ screams ] ...and you could find yourself... honey? ...on the couch. nyquil. 50% longer cough relief. that make kids happy. and even fewer that make moms happy too. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. [
, not disclosing that information when they get to the polls. >> joe, poll watching is done by all party, civil rights groups you and i have been affiliated with. there's nothing wrong with it. why would someone want to purposely deceive their connection or affiliation with poll watching unless there's something they're going to do -- we're dealing with here that does not meet the eye? >> they might get one of those samuel l. jackson attitudes, you know, get out of my face mentality. first of all, that's understand what this is -- who they're directing this at. they will -- it will slow down, for example, the process. now, if you slow down the process -- look how long the lines are been for voting early. imagine what the lines will look like on election day. you slow down the process by having all of these challenges. number two, the elderly are targeted because they lie and they say that a poll worker can't come out and help an elderly who might be in a car or van who has a wheelchair. that's a lie. it slows down those who think they might be discouraged, because i have a record even though i'
. ♪ >> bret: now some fresh pickings from the political grapevine. civil rights icon who gave benediction at president obama inauguration says he believes all white people are going tohill. 91-year-old reverend joseph laurie told a group of obama supporters in georgia he is frightened by the level of hatred and bitterness coming out of the election. monroe county reporter writes "laurie said when he was a young militant he used to say all white folks were going to hell. then he mellowed and just said most of them were. now he said he is back to where he was." laurie attacked those black georgians who did not vote in the 2008 election. and criticized the national anthem as too militaristic. lowery is expected to give a news conference on the topic on friday. >>> who women in dominican republic claim new jersey democratic senator menendez paid them for sex. they told the "daily caller" senator agreed to pay them $500 apiece and only paid them $100. menendez tells geraldo rivera that story is false, absolutely false and contrived. finally, if you have noticed, a lot more jokes about romney t
series. he had come out on a series looking on civil-rights issues in america. that was a fundamental place for me to learn. i also worked on a documentary series for a long time. i learned by working in production and by immediately working on things of my own. i do think there is a benefit to the best practices, the thing that happens in an institution where you are not just struggling to make the thing. you are talking about it and you also have community and resources. if you can afford it, that is a powerful route. i happened to learn the hardest way possible, which is by working in production and not doing anything else. >> is that an issue here, the kind of methods, the institutions and the pattern and career that allows people to be trained to do watch-dog type stuff, whether they are journalists or do similar things, are those trying up? -- drying up? >> documentary films are interesting. in some ways, that still exists. in journalism, the apprentice ship model the newspaper used to offer is definitely going away. you have a staff of 10 and you might be able to mentor some nu
right on par with civil rights of the 1960's. let's end the drug wars. legalize marijuana now. [applause] let's repeal the patriot act. [cheers and applause] i would have never signed the national defense authorization act allowing for you and i as u.s. citizens to be arrested and detained without being charged. that's the reason we fought wars in this country. [cheers and applause] i promise to submit a balanced budget to congress in the year 2013. that is a 1.4 trillion reduction in federal spending. if we don't do this now, we are going to find ourselves in a monetary collapse and a monetary collapse very simply is when the dollars we have in our pockets don't buy a thing because of the acome anying inflation -- because of the accompanying inflation that goes along with every dollar we spend. thathe only candidate wants to eliminate income tax, eliminate corporate tax, abolish the i.r.s. and replace all of that with one federal consumption tax, the fair tax. i think it is the answer to our exports, it is the answer to american jobs. [applause] >> in what way way does the war on drugs
was happening with anti-war movement and what was happening with respect to the civil rights movement, and so i would hope that we're going to see more of that. >> how come? >> because young people, they communicate in a lot of different ways and everything moves so fast today that you can set the world on fire in a positive way just through a message that goes through the internet in a way that -- i had to go buy an album or a cartridge, you know. that's old school. >> if you're re-elected, you go into a second term, sasha and malia will be in the midst of their teens. what are you most worried about, malia getting a driver's license, malia going out on a date, or malia being on facebook? >> i'd worry about facebook right now, only because, look, i know the folks at facebook, obviously they've revolutionized the social networks, but malia because she's well known, you know, i'm very keen on her protecting her privacy. she can make her own decisions obviously later as she gets older. but right now, even just for security reasons, she doesn't have a facebook page. dates, that's fine because she
was a student body president there and a college quarterback. he got his start as a civil rights leader there. he was talking to students and reminding them of the sacrifices that their parents and grandparents made when the civil rights movements happened. in durham, he led a march of students to register to vote. they have sunday registration here in north carolina and early registration period there is a two-week period where you can actually vote. there is a two-week window where you can vote. later in the day, we had alicia keys, the singer and songwriter, who had about 1000 people in raleigh at a park edit for atomic late african- american neighborhood and was urging people to vote. in a suburb of raleigh, smithfield, in a tobacco warehouse which is a schumann this warehouse, we had about 5000 people show up to here pat mccrory, the republican for governor and chris christie. this is his third trip to the state. he has campaigned so often, he says he is thinking of moving here. he has campaigned for the republican ticket. host: i'm sure they would miss the governor dearly if he were to
. >> rebuttal. >> education is a civil rights issue of our generation. we are making progress in delaware in terms of narrowing the achievement gap. as we do this we want to do it by raising the achievements of all students. that is what we are doing. i am more excited about what is or nonpublic schools in delaware that i have ever been. -- in public schools in delaware than i have ever been. we can first place to plant five years ago. it is one thing to win a competition, and now we are making progress. announced two months ago for the school year ending in june, 10,000 more kids proficient in reading. >> i just want you to speak to the racial part. >> we narrowed that achievement gap. >> i am interested in the gaps. >> the investments we are making will help african-americans, it is our significant commitment to early childhood education. over the next five years, we will improve the percentage of high needs kids enrolled in a quality preschool. that is a game changer. if you ever met a 5-year-old that is a couple years behind, is a tragedy. the most effective investment we can make as
. it began with the passage of the civil rights act in the '60s when the old dixiecrats like jesse helms left the democratic party because it became too racially inclusive and began gradually to take over the republican party. it's so dangerous to have one of our two big parties controlled by extremists because it makes people think that issues are equally divided when they are, in fact, not. they're 70-30 or 60-40. i think our long-term job is to take back the republican party. >> and just very quickly what is your prediction for tuesday? >> you know, it all depends who votes. if it is a lowered voter turnout, which obviously the governor and legislature of florida wants because they have cut the voting time almost in half and increased the ballot to 12 pages or something, then it will be an older, richer, whiter electorate. if it is a higher turnout, then it will be a more inclusive electorate. so a low turnout will elect romney-ryan. a high turnout, a true democratic turnout, will absolutely re-elect obama. >> yeah, and some states, from what i understand, the voting forums are like 30 pag
with civil rights. grant was the last of the lincoln republicans. one point i make is grant was the last president, the only president between abraham lincoln and lyndon johnson who took civil-rights for african-americans seriously. after grant left office the former slaves were left to the tender mercies of the majority of the south and quickly they were shoved to the side. >> don't ask the question if you don't want bill to answer it thoroughly. >> i do accept yes and no, multiple choice questions. >> we only have three minutes and there's a serious deadline so a brief question. >> you said you want to write history or biography. when i read your benjamin franklin biography you sound like a particle american, the first to the modern in some sense. very different people speaking. , who is the first american in the sense that he or she has attitudes like we do and writing biographies and things like that between 1620, and 1770. >> i am not sure i understand the question. who is the first american? >> who would you think after early colonization would have american attitudes that we recog
for one minute rebuttal. markell: psychiatry arne duncan says and i agree that education is a civil rights issue of our generation. we are making progress in delaware and closing the chief of the gatt which we keep a close eye on. the achievement gap we want to raise the achieve of all students, and that is exactly what we are doing. i am more excited about what is going on in public schools in delaware today than i've ever been. my wife and i. she went all the way through the schools right here in newark, but i'm more excited today. we came in first place in two and half years ago on race to the top. it's one thing to win a competition and now we are implementing it and making progress. we just announced two months ago that it ended in june 2000 market for proficient in reading and 9,000 more proficient enough in the year before. i want you to speak to the racial difference. we know that achievement gap. i thought you were asking about all the folks >> moderator: the only significant investment we are making we have a lot of african-american kids as our significant commitment to early chi
form of tax increase. we should lead by setting a high example for civil liberties and civil rights and due process and rule of law which is why we should close guantanamo and restore habeas corpus. i know he'll be able to help me turn the page on the ugly partisanship in washington so we can bring democrats and republicans together to pass an agenda that works for the american people. jon: well, that was then-senator barack obama promising big change during his 2008 successful presidential campaign. those promises you just heard pretty much went unfulfilled over the past four years including his vow to work with the other side of the aisle. our next guest says if president obama had lived up to his promises, things would look very different right now. fred barnes writing in "the weekly standard," quote: if he had done in his first term what he now vows to accomplish in his second term, he'd be this a far stronger position to win re-election next tuesday. he might have been a shoo-in. fred, you know, people have short memories when it comes to re-election time. take us back to four
equality. question 6 strengthens protections for our churches and guarantees the civil right to commit to the one you love. while there are those trying to divide us, presidents obama and clinton stand with us. pastors, business leaders, newspapers, democrats and republicans are all coming together for question 6. because it's about fairness-- treating everyone equal under the law. and who could be against that? (bell ringshi. yes? you know those delicious granola bunches in honey bunches of oats? i love those. we've added more to every box. really? wow! honey bunches of oats. make your day bunches better. would ban all abortions and contraception seemed a bit extreme. so i looked into it. turns out, romney doesn't oppose contraception at all. in fact, he thinks abortion should be an option in cases of rape, incest, or to save a mother's life. this issue's important to me, but i'm more concerned about the debt our children will be left with. i voted for president obama last time, but we just can't afford four more years. [ romney ] i'm mitt romney and i approve this message. >>> i love
guaranteeing civil rights and searching for ways to live peacefully in the world. it means choosing dialogue over blame. respect over division. hope over fear. what made george a great public servant was not only his compassion and integrity, but it was his uncommon vision. he saw connections others did not see, like, the connection between political stability and hungry children. that vision became food for peace. and the mcgovern-adult education program. he also saw things sooner than others. in 1962, he said the most important issue of our time is the establishment of conditions for world peace. nine months into his first term, he gave his first speech on the non. -- vietname. -- vietnam. 1970, he warned about the dependence of the united states on fossil fuels. in 1984, he urged all of our american leadership to understand the complexity, challenges, and the volatility of circumstances in the middle east. i believe america would be a better place had george become president of the united states. [applause] that does not mean his campaign was a failure. far from it. the 1972 campaign open
of pennsylvania women. and has been appointed to the executive committee of the leadership conference on civil rights. she has authored many publications and articles including for u.s. a today and the "new york times." she has served as counsel in major litigation cases dealing with sex discrimination in schools, sexual harassment in the workplace, sex discrimination in intercollegiate athletic programs, and pay equity. among other issues. they say if you want a job well done, give it to a busy woman. and it gives me great pleasure to introduce to you a most accomplished and very busy woman. here to talk to us today about the importance of the women's vote and the 2012 election, the founder and copresident of the national women's law center marsha greenberger. >> well, thank you very much. thank you for that extraordinarily generous introduction. from the incomparable judy 11. and i have to tell you what a pleasure it is to be here and i must also confess to a personal relationship that i think had something to do with this invitation. the national women's law center has an incomparable ms. l
insider rights this a -- guest: the civil union issue, i think that is accurate, by the way. i have not see the civil union issue pop up in to the contras as of the average voter. on the margins, -- into the consciousness of the average voter. on the margins, it may pop up. although, it would traditionally break into the democratic party since they have been the sponsor of this type of legislation in the legislature. the predominant issue around the country is the economy. host: the bloomberg insider also reports -- guest: can we do a better job, absolutely. and we must do a better job for one to remain a relevant party on the national scene, and particularly in the west. the latino vote, the hispanic vote as we like to call that in the west, it had shifted toward the republicans under president and former colorado gov. bill once actually won the hispanic vote here in 2002. it began to slip away. we had some issues with one of our congressman, congressman tom tancredo pushed away some of those votes. of the active voting provision is about 16%. the -- the acting voting population is
keep reading that the civil engineers society in country say the power infrastructure is very far behind when it comes to transmission lines, et cetera. why is it, why are we so far behind? is governor cuomo right to be critical or is he and other politicians part of the problem when it comes to the regulatory framework? >> he's right to be vinlg want. that's part of his job. >> but what's the problem? why are we so far behind? >> i'm not sure there's as much of a problem as is being stated. the infrastructure is aning a bit aging a bit, but there is the question of keeping electricity prices down. utilities would be happy to enhance and modernize the infrastructure, but the pressure from their own regulators sometimes keeps them from doing it. >> that is a key point. can i go there with you? that is such a total key point. you've got all these regulations. it is the opposite, the total opposite of free market economi economics. and one of the functions of the utility is to provide shareholders with a decent rate of return which means you can make the infrastructure changes that y
, and that was basically a number of people representing the different religious and civil institutions in the country. this group of people, together, they issued a number of very important documents relating to citizenship and how the most important element in the future of egypt was the right of citizenship for every egyptian respective of race, irrespective of religion, irrespective of wealth of the this was a country that we were going to build for all our citizens, and then there was a number of -- another important document that was produced, and that was relating to the basic rights, like, the rights -- the right to believe in whatever form you want. the right to express yourself. the right to be creative, and now they are working on a third document which is related to women's issues in general so these groups are both religious and civil society groups who came together in order to point the way for the future, and this is particularly important for two reasons. first, out of the revolution, we have a people that's been empowered. a people that feels that, and i call it the "revolution," and
to be on health benefits. and i believe civil unions should be acceptable so they should have these rights. but this is between a man and woman. i believe two people that want to make that commitment it should be marriage. that's why the human rights campaign gave me their endorsement >> do you think it's a moderate district? >> it is a moderate district. i think it's more fiscally conservative and socially moderate. . >> i know the majority of my district supports marriage quality and employment non-discrimination act yet mr. dole opposes that. >> let's go to another question and the question is for mr. insider. >> why vnlt you released your tax return? >> the voters want to know what i've owned even our kids savings accounts are included with the report i filed. >> what do you pay in terms of tax rates? >> that's been reported in the papers as well. my wife has her own career. she has employees and clients and competitors. she's not running for congress. i believe my wife has a certain degree of privacy. everything voters want to know about my finances is in the report. >> they're entitl
these guys. at the end of the day, the overwhelming majority of guys in civil service are doing just that. obviously, it's politically astute for christie to be doing it, but he's doing it for a reason -- you genuinely believe this is a guy who wants to do right by his people. barack obama, you're seeing a human being there. and the camera doesn't lie. obviously, will this weigh an election -- obviously, it leans clearly for obama, but what i love about this is what you see with these guys is the same what you see with the guys in the streets of hoboken that were affected. i believe people are overwhelmingly are tremendously decent including politicians, and you're seeing that. >> is it too cynical to read all this in? let's be clear. analysis is happening within the washington political bubble. but i think if you're watching on television, you're seeing chris christie doing what he has to do for his state and the president doing what a president does, arriving in a disaster zone offering consolation but also his federal help. >> yeah. that's all true. but it does have a political impact.
to tolerate it and sort of equated it to the first amendment. that is never going to be my approach to civil liberties or equality. i am proud that we overturned don't ask, don't tell. and yes, marriage and equality is the right thing to do. >> rep wilson? >> the alpha lincolnville that you have sponsored, federal funding from schools, if there is believed in the schools, bullying for any reason is an unacceptable. i think that is best dealt with by teachers and parents and authorities, not by cutting funds from a school if there is bullying going on in the school. that is the position i take. like you, i am a parent. we do not need washington to solve those problems for us. >> rep? >> actually, when congress when wilson was in congress, she helped pass the no child left behind legislation, and it did just that. it took away power from our schools and put it into a one size fits all structure that does not teach new mexico kids. i would repeal the legislation. >> i'm going to do something a little different here, and give each of you a chance for one more were bottle on this issue, starting
't forget about that. we have to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities. for example he we have continued to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we have provide add broad range of essential services today to combatant commanders, that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide air and missile defense for all the commanders. we provide logistical support for all the geographical combatant commanders. we provide signal communication support to all the geographical combatant commanders. these are key critical missions that people tend not to think about. as we go forward. so it's important that you understand that. we provide key for aviation, fires, information operation, civil affairs, military police, wmd defense capabilities. corps of engineers who are pretty busy today and doing many other things. we have critical components of the military space program. for example, we are responsible for everything from the sa
is elected, we will go back to being barefoot and pregnant and the states or as they're going right now are going to start becoming small countries if power is given to them. and people in the south will see the rise again of us moving into the civil war type situation. host: before we talk to you we were talking about gender issues. do social issues whatever factor into voting there in wisconsin? guest: sure, like anywhere else they go into i think the way people line up in both parties and that's -- i don't know if it's any more true or less true in wisconsin than any other state host: california. our independent line. craig, you're on. caller: is this for me now? host: you're on, sir. go ahead. caller: i wasn't sure because you didn't list it properly. host: we're running out of time. go ahead. caller: i just want to mention because i think there's a problem with semantics in this country. and what i mean by that is everybody looks at romney from the standpoint as this man as a builder. he's not a builder he's a dismantler. and anybody that's familiar with construction fully realize
Search Results 0 to 43 of about 44 (some duplicates have been removed)